From the Site Studio

Environmental Ranking for the Environment: Sustainable SITES Initiative

Swaner Board WalkThe U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Rating System is a well know certification criteria for assessing the environmental impact of new and remodeled building projects. But what about the impact of the landscapes near and on which those buildings sit? The Sustainable Sites Initiative and the corresponding SITES™ Rating System is a collaboration between the American Society of Landscape Architects, the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, and the United States Botanic Garden. It is an environmental ranking system specifically for the land, and covers things such as Open Spaces, Plazas, Yards, and Commercial/Government Grounds. Continue reading

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From the Government Studio, General

Salt Lake City: Assimilated by the Borg

SLC Federal Courthouse

Learn more about the Thomas Phifer & Partners designed courthouse here: http://www.architectmagazine.com/government-projects/united-states-courthouse-designed-by-thomas-phifer-and-partners_o.aspx [Photo: Scott Frances]

By Jim Nielson, FAIA, Senior Principal of CRSA’s Government Studio

A few years ago I worked with subcontractors, friends, and family members to build a home I had designed for my parents. Today my younger brother, who purchased the home after my mother passed away, reports that while people under the age of 20 fall in love with the home almost universally, the reaction of older visitors is mixed. They either love it or hate it. Continue reading

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From the Preservation Studio, General

Can My Historic Building be Green?

By Rachel David, LEED AP BD+C | Rachel is CRSA’s Sustainability Director and the coordinator for all the firm’s LEED Certified projects. 

Can my historic building be green?

It’s a common question tied to the assumption that modern technologies and materials are automatically more sustainable. It can be surprising that often the greenest building is the one that is already standing.

Moab City Center

The LEED Silver Moab City Center is a remodeled 1923 school. The massive masonry and operable windows were retained to assist with natural cooling.

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