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Productivity + Delegation

CRSA Blog-roductivity-delegation

Productivity + Delegation

Productivity guru Chris Bailey, author of The Productivity Project, once spent 10 days in complete isolation to study how social interactions impact productivity. He followed that by watching 72 hours of TED talks in one week to explore how overloading the mind translates into retention, learning, and of course, productivity. From these and many other experiments, he recently extracted “Four Common Mistakes Making You Less Productive”. Continue reading

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6 Key Terms for Key Profit

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Architecture firms design buildings in exchange for compensation. With the exception of pro bono work, that’s the premise everyone agrees to when they sign a contract. And we measure the success of that exchange in lots of ways…and use lots of terms to describe those measurements. It may be Project Management 101, but here are six of those key terms, and why they matter. Continue reading

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For Business’ Sake

For Business Sake

Architects are dreamers. Architects are visionaries. Architects are agents for community development and societal change. But Architects are also employees, of real businesses, trying to make real money to live real lives. It’s not a glamorous concept, but it is foundational. All too often there is an underlying assumption that the “higher order” aspects of architecture like refined spatial relationships and bold gestures cannot coexist with such day-to-day aspects like billing projections and profit margins. There is an artificial dichotomy that says business cannot be beautiful, and beautiful design cannot make for good business. Continue reading

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From the Government Studio, General

Their Hubris is Stunning

By Jim Nielson, AIA, Senior Principal and Director of CRSA’s Government Studio

If I have the self-confidence to lead a design team into a newly imagined world no one has ever visited before, that confidence can be the catalyst for creation. But with it I can also lead followers astray. If I am proud of my achievements, that pride may motivate me to accomplish great things—unless I am so proud I become arrogant and start thinking of myself as invincible. Transformative architecture depends to no small degree on self-confidence and pride. Yet unrestrained, pride becomes hubris, also known as arrogance.

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Why We Do What We Do #1: Why We Build Up

“Why We Do What We Do” is an ongoing series exploring common practices that architects and builders have employed for hundreds of years, and how those same practices are being reinvented, but not necessarily replaced, in the modern age. Other entries include: “Why We Draw” and “Why We Model”

Wuhan Phoenix Towers

Concept for the Phoenix Towers in Wuhan, China (http://goo.gl/bymDyi)

Architecture and Design journal eVolo recently reported on preliminary plans for a new “World’s Tallest Skyscraper”. Continue reading

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From the Site Studio, General

The Great Divide: Marketing vs. Management

Daybreak UTA Station

Daybreak Light Rail Station – Part of CRSA’s continued work for the Utah Transit Authority

By Kelly Gillman, AICP, ASLA | Kelly Gillman is a Senior Principal at CRSA and leads the Landscape Architecture and Planning Studio. He also holds an MBA from Westminster College.

We often say that doing quality work is the best form of marketing. The idea is that our day-to-day performance speaks louder than any brochure or resume. But is this true? And if so, to what extent?

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From the Government Studio

First, Do No Harm (Part 4)

Unintended Consequences

Utah Capitol and FlagJim Nielson, AIA, is a Senior Principal with CRSA and a Utah State Representative. First, Do No Harm is a series of posts about how what happens on Utah’s Capitol Hill affects public, business, and personal budgets. This final post reviews the difficulty of tracing the outcome of decisions accurately and emphasizes the need to be aware of the consequences.

 

Missed a Part?

Whenever governments or other groups set out as a group to accomplish something, the challenge usually is not so much putting a policy in place and mobilizing resources as it is ensuring that what we do actually accomplishes the objective.

We work together in government and organized groups to accomplish what no one could do individually. What I’ve noticed as a participant in government Continue reading

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From the Marketing Department, General

5 Keys to Question & Answer Sessions

Fran PruynFran Pruyn is the Director of Marketing and Business Development at CRSA. She is also a theatre director with decades years of experience. She has coached hundreds proposal interviews, we stopped counting.

“We won it in the Q&A.”

Yep, you can score big with a selection committee during the question and answer period and be awarded a project.  You can also go down in flames, when one member says just the wrong thing.
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From the Marketing Department

Imagination, Vision and Us

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“Rambling Man Sketch” by apkconcepts. Check out apkconcepts.wordpress.com for more great drawings.

 

By Fran Pruyn, CRSA Marketing Director

I have been included on a couple of project teams lately.  Wow, what a rush!

I don’t know what surprised me most, the “sky’s the limit” feeling at the beginning of a project, or that the team was so willing to listen to my wacky ideas.

Not burdened by anything like architectural knowledge, economic reality, or zoning laws, I only have my imagination and a world of possibilities to rely upon when asked: “what should go here?” or “what does this want to be?”  Maybe that is okay. Continue reading

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From the Government Studio

First, Do No Harm (Part 1)

Public Policy and our Pocketbooks

Representative Jim NielsonJim Nielson, AIA, is a Senior Principal with CRSA and a Utah State Representative. First, Do No Harm is a series of posts about how what happens on Utah’s Capitol Hill affects public, business, and personal budgets. This segment sets the stage, and will be followed by a look at specific laws passed in the 2014 session.

Years before I decided on architecture school, my first thought was an MBA. As I was deciding, I worked initially as a management analyst for a large defense contractor. Shortly thereafter, I served for several years as a policy analyst at the U.S. Department of Education in Washington. Continue reading

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