From the Site Studio

Thoughts on Reading our Urban Fabric

Ryan Wallace works with CRSA’s SITE and Higher Education Studios
Granary District Tracks to Downtown

“Cities need old buildings so badly, it is probably impossible for vigorous streets and districts to grow without them.”

This passage from the now famous book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, reveals author Jane Jacobs’ beliefs about the importance of retaining old buildings, even if they are considered to function poorly by the standards of the day. She goes on to argue the importance of old buildings in providing affordability for young families and creative individuals to live in urban neighborhoods. This diversity of age, occupation and income is integral to creating a vibrant street life, in her opinion. Continue reading

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From the Government Studio

First, Do No Harm (Part 2)


Construction, Incentives and Mandates

Jim Nielson, AIA, is a Senior Principal with CRSA and a Utah State Representative. First, Do No Harm is a series of posts about how what happens on Utah’s Capitol Hill affects public, business, and personal budgets. In this segment, we look at some of the laws passed in 2014 that may impact all of our financial health. This includes legislation that affects the A/E Industry, as well as broader changes.Patriotic Pumpkin

Missed a Part?

 

Construction

We in the design and construction industry see the legislature’s impact on our bottom line quite directly. When the legislature funds and authorizes public construction projects, RFPs for design and construction services follow almost immediately. Earlier this year the Utah Legislature gave the green light to around $200 million in public construction. For many firms, fees from such projects make up a significant part of their annual revenues. Continue reading

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From the Marketing Department

Imagination, Vision and Us

vision-architecture-sketch

“Rambling Man Sketch” by apkconcepts. Check out apkconcepts.wordpress.com for more great drawings.

 

By Fran Pruyn, CRSA Marketing Director

I have been included on a couple of project teams lately.  Wow, what a rush!

I don’t know what surprised me most, the “sky’s the limit” feeling at the beginning of a project, or that the team was so willing to listen to my wacky ideas.

Not burdened by anything like architectural knowledge, economic reality, or zoning laws, I only have my imagination and a world of possibilities to rely upon when asked: “what should go here?” or “what does this want to be?”  Maybe that is okay. Continue reading

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From the Government Studio

First, Do No Harm (Part 1)

Public Policy and our Pocketbooks

Representative Jim NielsonJim Nielson, AIA, is a Senior Principal with CRSA and a Utah State Representative. First, Do No Harm is a series of posts about how what happens on Utah’s Capitol Hill affects public, business, and personal budgets. This segment sets the stage, and will be followed by a look at specific laws passed in the 2014 session.

Years before I decided on architecture school, my first thought was an MBA. As I was deciding, I worked initially as a management analyst for a large defense contractor. Shortly thereafter, I served for several years as a policy analyst at the U.S. Department of Education in Washington. Continue reading

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From the Preservation Studio

Personal Reflections on the Career of a Historic Preservationist

 

OgdenHigh Sidebar

Ogden High School Renovation

By Allen D. Roberts, AIA

As I pondered my calendar recently, I realized that next month will mark my 40th (fortieth!) year as an historic preservation professional. Some years ago, I found myself asking how and why I got into this field. It came to me that I have always lived in historic cities and attended or lived in historic schools, churches and homes. Moreover, history, art and aesthetics have always been important to me. It was the tragic and puzzling demolition of the spectacular Coalville/Summit Stake Tabernacle in 1971 that catalyzed my interest in preserving buildings. Continue reading

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